Blog

Search by author name or post title:

  or  

Blog Posts

The Metrics Society: The IoT and its Role in Marketing Automation

Posted By: Davis Van Luven

Gartner predicts 26 billion devices will be connected to the IoT by 2020. ABI predicts 30 billion devices will be connected wirelessly. The 2015 UK budget puts aside £40,000,000 for research into the Internet of Things. The completed scenario calls for people, animals, and products to be tagged with a unique IP address. New versions of IP are under development to answer to the Big Data issues involved with the IoT. The Internet of Things is no more an endgame then the internet itself, but it is a foreseeable future. It may lead to the interconnection of every card-carrying human on the planet. It may lead to civilization and everything it produces locking into a quantifiable, accessible network and perhaps, an over reliance on a complex automation. The IoT will lend to breaches in security and compromised personal privacy. It is science fiction becoming a reality. The only sure bet is that it will be extremely beneficial to marketing practices and the generation of quality leads through the use of socio-environmental analytics. The primary benefit will be the perfection of marketing automation. An example: Watchmaster is a hypothetical company that manufactures middle to high-shelf wrist watches. The product is integrated with smart technology, powered by a low-functioning OS. It displays the weather, time, and other personalized information. It is a fitness tracker and a heart rate monitor. But most importantly, it is connected to the internet. The information recorded by the watch is stored online. The records are then viewed by the watch-wearer through an application that presents the results as easy-to-read schematics, it logs times into a calendar, it recommends new routines, and so on and so forth. But what other information could it be sending and to whom? The most practical application is automated troubleshooting solutions. The watch malfunctions and the error is automatically reported to the manufacturer’s server. The error is then processed and measured against other errors sent from other watches. That specific class of error is then reported, filed, and quantified so that the problem can be easily analyzed by the programmers who would then mend the program and remotely fix the broken watch. The patch would be in place and any future errors of that class would be automatically mended. An apology message would be sent to the watch wearer. Feedback would be instantaneous. Excellent. But it doesn’t end there. Because of the nature of smart technology and its close proximity to the user, the list of quantifiable observations is endless. Therefore, the marketing response is limitless. The watch isn’t working and the watch wearer has realized this. The wearer is responding. Where is the wearer? Where does the wearer go? What is the wearer’s heart rate? Is the watch removed? How often does the wearer check the watch to see if it’s working again? Then, once the problem is fixed, all of same questions can be asked and the answers can be compared and analyzed. Eventually, the analytic model will be completely automated: •Information is collected from tangibles •Statistical analytics •Energy usage and practical usage •Marketing analytics •Feedback This cycle would repeat for every unit sold. Every car, head of cattle, light bulb, and door knob. Perhaps, every child born. A complete picture is formed. The results are filtered and repetitive task are fully automated to drastically reduce the chances of human error. Will it become a dystopian nightmare or a marketers dream? Or does one hand lead the other?


17 Jul 2018
0 Likes | 0 Comments
Read More

Tech Talk: Caitlin Loos and Christopher Bloom from Phase2

Posted By:

Check out our Tech Talk with Caitlin Loos and Christopher Bloom from Phase2! Phase2 is "a digital agency moving industry leading organizations forward with powerful ideas and executable digital strategies built on open technology."


18 Jul 2018
0 Likes | 0 Comments
Read More
 

6 Tips for Successful Networking

Posted By: Lindsey Young, Marketing Director

It’s estimated that 80% of junior level positions are not posted. So how do companies fill these positions? Every introverts worst dream: Networking. Networking is an important part of any career. It can present you with opportunities to learn from experts and your peers, present you with an opportunity to work on side projects that align with your interests, give you a sense of community in your field of work, and most notably networking can greatly improve your chances of landing a great job. For many beginners networking can be an intimidating task, so we’ve put together 5 tips to help you blossom into a networking pro: 1. Attend meetups The hardest part of networking is often knowing where to go. One of the best places to start is finding groups with similar interests on Meetup.com or similar websites. While the idea of walking into a room with strangers can seem intimidating, most of these meetups are a casual setting of people networking and sharing ideas. Meetups can be a great way to get your foot in the door at many companies, they offer opportunities to interact with professionals you might not otherwise have access to, and most of all give a face and personality to what otherwise is just a name on a paper. 2. Learn how to network a room As an introvert myself, learning this skill was an uphill battle sprinkled with awkward encounters. There are countless books and resources online that can provide a great plan and starting point, but the best way to improve your networking skills is to put yourself out there and get some practice. Find similar interests by asking open ended questions. Asking about projects that they’re working on or how they got started in tech or at their company are good ways to get the ball rolling. 3. Have business cards What might seem like an outdated practice in the days of LinkedIn, Business cards make it easy for someone you meet to follow up with you, while showing a level of professionalism and preparation. They can be 4. Don’t be “bad at names” Keeping track of who’s who can be difficult after leaving an event multiple business cards. A good practice is to write a note about your exchange with someone on their business card on in a notebook to help remember who you meet. 5. Follow Up You won’t need to follow up with everyone you meet, but it’s important to know how to effectively do so when you’re interested in building a professional relationship. It’s nice to add a personal touch, so when following up (via email or LinkedIn) try to circle back to something you were discussing. For example, you can send them an interesting link relevant to your conversation or let them know how a piece of advice they gave you helped you out. Just mentioning what you were discussing could be helpful to jog the recipients memory, but try to contribute something to the conversation. 6. Quality is better than quantity When building a network focus on having more meaningful interactions than trying to speak to single person in the room. The ‘quality over quantity’ rule also applies to following up with people you meet. People are busy, and their time is valuable. Following up is a good practice, but make sure you have something of value to say or to contribute.


18 Jul 2018
1 Likes | 0 Comments
Read More

Tech Talk: Temple Naylor

Posted By:

Temple is an enthusiastic and inspiring young graduate of The Tech Academy's Software Developer Boot Camp. After completing the program, Temple went on to begin his successful technology career in Portland. In this talk he shares his personal insight into both the mindset and sales aspect relating to finding a job.


23 Jul 2018
0 Likes | 0 Comments
Read More
 

CIRR and The Tech Academy

Posted By: Lindsey Young, Marketing Director

Education is a huge investment of both time and money. While there is typically a high return on this investment, especially with coding bootcamps (because of their lower cost and a shorter duration), it is still important for potential students to be able to make informed decisions on where to invest in their education. In order to make informed decisions students need accurate information on graduate outcomes, that is easily comparable from boot camp to boot camp. The Tech Academy is committed to transparency, and to providing potential students with accurate, verified, and easy-to-understand reports on our outcomes. That is why we have joined the Council on Integrity in Results Reporting. The Council on Integrity in Results Reporting (CIRR) is a non-profit that aims to help provide potential students with accurate, transparent, and complete student outcome reports for participating bootcamps. What CIRR does is provide “a standardized system for measuring and reporting outcomes that all of its schools use.” (cirr.org) The reports are easy for students to understand, ensuring they can make informed decisions about where to invest their time and money. Another benefit of CIRR is that the information is verified and up-to-date. Participating bootcamps must report their graduate outcomes every six months, with documentation to back up the data. Documentation includes offer letters, written confirmation letters by employers, etc. This information is then verified by a third party. So, you are probably asking yourself what information you can find on CIRR. Here are some important questions that CIRR reports can answer: - How many students graduated on time? - Within six months, how many accepted a full-time position in their field of study? - How many are in part-time positions? - Did the school hire on any graduates to its staff? - How many are in jobs in a different field of study? - What are the salaries for graduates with positions in their field of study? The Tech Academy currently has graduate reports posted for our online program and Portland program from January to July 2017. As CIRR continues to post updated reports every six months, you will have access to the most current graduate data. Here is some of the information you can find on The Tech Academy’s graduate report: - Within 90 days of completing the course, the percentage of online students employed in full-time paid positions in their field of study was 79.2%, with the number rising to 87.5% after 180 days. - The median annual base salary for both Portland and online students was $60,000. - 40.9% of graduates report their job title as “Developer”. To read The Tech Academy’s CIRR reports in-full visit: https://cirr.org/data, or copy and paste the following links into your browser. https://static.spacecrafted.com/b13328575ece40d8853472b9e0cf2047/r/a54d4a7a2bd2467f8f1ba4fdb7b090ca/1/The%20Tech%20Academy%20(Remote).pdf https://static.spacecrafted.com/b13328575ece40d8853472b9e0cf2047/r/f2e1809f53d64125baadbc6a3725e778/1/The%20Tech%20Academy%20(Portland).pdf


27 Jul 2018
6 Likes | 0 Comments
Read More

Page 2 of 3
Contact Us!