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30 Apr 2019

6 TIPS FOR SUCCESSFUL NETWORKING

Posted By: The Tech Academy

By: Lindsey Young, Marketing Director of The Tech Academy




It’s estimated that 70-80% of junior level positions are not posted. So how do companies fill these positions? Every introverts worst dream: Networking.

Per a recent study, 85% of all jobs are filled through networking!

Networking refers to going out and meeting new people. It’s spreading the word about what you can offer. Networking can also refer to utilization of existing connections (such as friends and family) to obtain new connections – such as meeting the Hiring Manager of a company through a friend that works there. Basically, it comes down to promoting yourself to others and forming new relationships.

Networking is an important part of any career. It can present you with opportunities to learn from experts and your peers, present you with an opportunity to work on side projects that align with your interests, give you a sense of community in your field of work, and most notably networking can greatly improve your chances of landing a great job.

For many beginners, networking can be an intimidating task, so we’ve put together 6 tips to help you blossom into a networking pro:

  1. Attend meetups
  2. The hardest part of networking is often knowing where to go. One of the best places to start is finding groups with similar interests on Meetup.com or other such websites. While the idea of walking into a room with strangers can seem intimidating, most of these meetups are a casual setting of people networking and sharing ideas.

  3. Learn how to network through experience
  4. As an introvert myself, learning this skill was an uphill battle sprinkled with awkward encounters. There are countless books and resources online that can provide a great plan and starting point, such as The Complete Software Developer’s Career Guide by John Sonmez, but the best way to improve your networking skills is to put yourself out there and get some practice.

    Find similar interests by asking open ended questions. Asking about projects that they’re passionate about or how they got their start in tech or at their company are good ways to get the ball rolling.

    Simply put: ask questions about them and then tell them what you’re looking for.

  5. Have a purpose and plan beforehand
  6. Are you networking to find a job? To increase sales? To learn new skills? To find an investor?

    Establish a clear goal so that you’re adequately prepared when you go out. Your reason for networking also affects what types of events you attend. For example: someone looking for a job in manufacturing wouldn’t attend a book club (though, who knows?).

    Once you’ve established the “product” you want to obtain through networking, make a plan. Your plan could be as simple as: “Talk to as many people as I can,” “If they go around asking everyone to introduce themselves, mention that I am interested in a developer position,” “Hand out 25 business cards,” etc.

    Being prepared and focused will help ensure you take full advantage of the opportunity, and could help alleviate your nerves.

  7. Have business cards
  8. What might seem like an outdated practice in the days of LinkedIn, Business cards make it easy for anyone to follow up with you, while also showing professionalism and preparation.

    If you are currently unemployed, simply put “Software Developer” or some such title on the card. At many meetups, they even have a place where attendees can leave business cards.

  9. Don’t be “bad at names”
  10. After leaving an event with multiple business cards, keeping track of who’s who can be difficult. A good practice is to write a note about your exchange with someone on their business card or in a notebook to help remember who you meet. You can even keep a spreadsheet of all the contacts made and track future follow ups. Try to do this right after leaving an event, while your memories are still fresh.

  11. Follow Up
  12. You won’t need to follow up with everyone you meet, but it’s important to know how to effectively do so when you’re interested in building a professional relationship. It’s nice to add a personal touch, so when following up (via email or LinkedIn) try to circle back to something you were discussing.

    For example: You can send them an interesting link relevant to your conversation or let them know how a piece of advice they gave you helped you out. Just mentioning what you were discussing could be helpful to jog the recipients memory, but try to contribute something to the conversation. If you’re looking for a job, send them your resume.

At The Tech Academy, we cover networking and the best job search practices in our Job Placement course (which is part of all our coding boot camps). To find out more, contact us today!




About the author: Lindsey Young is a Marketing professional who has been with The Tech Academy for over 2 years, where she has been part of a team whose goal is to help aid in the continued growth of the bootcamp and success of the students.

As The Tech Academy’s Marketing Director, she helps oversee ad and sponsorship campaigns, content creation, social media management, and all things marketing.

The Tech Academy is a technology school that trains students in computer programming and web development. They are the proud recipient of SwitchUp.Org’s and CourseReport.Com’s Best Coding Boot Camp award and were named the “World’s Greatest Code School” by How2Media.




The Tech Academy offers a wide range of services including:

  • Coding boot camps
  • Customized training classes for companies and groups
  • Advanced developer training
  • Software development
  • Staffing
And more…





Visit learncodinganywhere.com to find out more.

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02 May 2019

THE TECH ACADEMY PODCAST: Ep. 3 Gustav of Portland's 94.7 KNRK

Posted By: The Tech Academy

Local Portland listeners might recognize the voice of this week’s guest on The Tech Academy Podcast. In this episode Erik Gross sits down with radio personality Gustav, of Portland’s 94.7 KNRK! Gustav has been a presence on Portland radio since 1995; he's best known for co-hosting an alternative music show with Daria Eliuk, and also curates a Saturday night EDM program. In this episode, Erik and Gustav talk about our guest’s surprising background and interest in tech, how it applies to the media arts, how Gustav’s time living in Germany lead him to Radio tech, and so much more! Don’t forget to stay tuned at the end of the episode for Jack’s weekly tip! This one’s particularly helpful for someone who might be new to a company, or anyone who’s trying to climb that corporate ladder.

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03 May 2019

Tech Talk: The Difference Between the Internet and the World Wide Web

Posted By: The Tech Academy

Here's a sample video from our first course of our Software Developer Boot Camps, that covers the difference between the Internet and the World Wide Web with Co-Founder Erik Gross!

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08 May 2019

IS THERE A LACK OF AVAILABLE CODING TALENT?

Posted By: The Tech Academy

By: Jack C. Stanley, Co-Founder of The Tech Academy




There seem to be conflicting opinions on this matter.

I’ve come across articles stating that by 2020 there will be around one million unfilled coding positions available as well as articles that say the tech-talent shortage is a myth.

As the Co-Founder of The Tech Academy (a code school that works day-in and day-out training developers and then helping them find jobs), I am going to offer my input on this subject here.

What I see is that there is a lack of available coding talent. By all indications, at our current rate of training in the U.S., we will fall short on supplying the needed technical resources.

Recently, I interviewed a college professor who heads the Computer Science department at a prestigious university. He imparted to me that: even if every college in America operated at maximum capacity, there would still be a shortage of trained programmers to fill all programming jobs in the United States.

Here are some facts to consider:

There’s a wonderful short film (found here ) that explains the situation beautifully.

With all this said, just because someone is a trained computer programmer does not mean they will be employed. Regardless of industry, one must interview for jobs and interview well. Soft skills are comparable in importance to one’s coding abilities. Even if you’re a prodigy software developer, it takes hard work and good communication to land a job.

Typically you’re competing with other applicants. And while you will most likely be given a coding challenge and asked technical questions, you will also need to behave correctly in the interview.

For example: if you show up dressed unprofessionally, if you are rude in your interview, if you interrupt constantly, etc., you will most likely not be hired due to personality issues.

On the other hand, even if you perform well in an interview, don’t be surprised if you’re told, “we found someone who fits the position better”, “you’re not experienced enough” or “you lack adequate coding skills in ___”. It can be tough to hear, but realize there is competition even in a “buyer’s market”. Shrug it off and keep interviewing elsewhere! As another note on this point, (to use two idioms) it’s smart to have several irons in the fire at once and to not put all your eggs in one basket. Apply at many places.

I’ve seen situations wherein a software developer sits at home, sending one resume out a week, collecting unemployment checks and complaining about how there are no available jobs out there. Such individuals need to realize that finding a job should be treated like a job in itself: get up early and work all day sending out resumes, calling places, doing interviews, etc. Just because there are many available web and software development jobs out there, that does not mean they will be handed one on a silver platter. Harsh, but empirically true. It can take hard work and persistence to land a coding job. It actually takes work to land any job – tech or otherwise.

And as far as the statement that there aren’t coding jobs available, check out these sites:

  • Dice.com
  • Craigslist(the jobs section; specifically “software/qa/dba”, “system/network”, “technical support”, “web/info design” and “internet engineers”.)
  • Monster.com
  • Indeed

You can also work with a recruiter – there are many staffing agencies that love to place developers.

I could list countless resources for finding jobs but I think if one reviewed those sites they would quickly realize that there are many open I.T. positions. Plus, not all tech jobs are advertised. You can simply Google tech companies in your area and apply for a position at each of them.

Some computer scientists remain unemployed or work in non-tech industries. Why? I don’t know. You’d have to survey them. I’m sure each person has their own reason. But regardless of what you find, it can’t be that there are no available jobs.

I would say that there is a huge demand for software developers but one must be disciplined in getting trained and work hard at their job search. (By the way, there is an awesome resource by Buzzfeed that can help with tech job searches).

In closing, technology is constantly changing. People should continue to educate themselves in coding, stay abreast of the most current versions of things and regularly write code. A coder from ten years ago, that hasn’t programmed since, will find it hard to land a job.

At The Tech Academy, we cover in-demand and modern skills. We also provide a firm foundation in the fundamentals of computer science and technology, so graduates are prepared for the future. Here is a great video illustrating our approach: Tech Academy Enrollment Video.

This is my take on the subject based on experience and research. Feel free to look into this matter for yourself!




About the author: With years of executive and managerial experience, Jack C. Stanley has overseen The Tech Academy since its inception. He owns and operates several successful companies.

His background in teaching and curriculum development contributed greatly to the creation of The Tech Academy’s boot camps. As the Co-Founder and chairman of the school’s Board of Directors, he supervises the day-to-day activities and long-term planning for the school.

The Tech Academy is a technology school that trains students in computer programming and web development. They are the proud recipient of SwitchUp.Org’s and CourseReport.Com’s Best Coding Boot Camp award and were named the “World’s Greatest Code School” by How2Media.




The Tech Academy offers a wide range of services including:

  • Coding boot camps
  • Customized training classes for companies and groups
  • Advanced developer training
  • Software development
  • Staffing
And more…





Visit learncodinganywhere.com to find out more.

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09 May 2019

THE TECH ACADEMY PODCAST: Ep. 4 Dennis Kravets

Posted By: The Tech Academy

This week on the podcast, co-founder Erik Gross sits down with Dennis Kravets! Dennis is a Tech Academy graduate, who has since started his own Web Development company. Hear about Dennis' journey from selling his first website at 16, joining the army at 17 to now being a business owner, and everything in between! To send us off, Jack shares a helpful tip for improving productivity at work!


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