22 Feb

The Tech Academy Orientation Video

The live project was a really great experience for me, and a great insight into working with code in the real world. It was definitely tricky at first, jumping into someone else's code and feeling a bit lost. It took a few days for me to get up to speed and really feel like I knew what was going on, but once I did, I gained a lot more confidence and was able to make what I feel was an immediate impact. Working on this project really drove home the importance of using descriptive and clear comments when coding. Not only does it allow you to remember what you've done and why, but it makes it much easier and faster for other people to understand your code and what each part does.

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19 MAY

Student Cheryl L. on the Database & SQL Course

I was exposed briefly to SQL during my first job as a technical writer in the early to mid-1990s but didn’t actually use it, so this was an entirely new learning experience. Designing and building database via SQL coding, and then executing queries against them, is like assembling a big puzzle and then pulling various pieces out of the puzzle. The designing and building is putting the puzzle together and the queries are the extraction, although you’re never really taking apart the puzzle. You’re just looking at parts of the assembled puzzle and then putting back the pieces for future perspectives executed through queries.

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22 Feb

The Tech Academy Orientation Video

I also learned how important it can be to work with other people and gain other perspectives. There are usually many ways to accomplish different tasks when coding, and getting new and different points of view can be really helpful when solving a problem. This experience will be super helpful in the real world because it gives me a taste of what it's like to work on a project and be a part of stand-ups with a team.

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19 MAY

Student Jason Arnoff on the Basic Javascript Course

Remembering that the cpu can only do one thing at a time, and remembering this will serve me well in the future. That flowcharting is a very simple and effective tool to get good at. Break things down into smaller problems/ chunks you work on. How dealing with frustration is a normal everyday thing to learn how to handle. Trust in yourself that you don’t need to be 100% versed in a specific when entering into a project. You will need to learn and figure a way through the projects that you need to accomplish. Figuring it out is part of the challenge. Commenting code is always a good idea.

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2 MAR
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Student Shelly on the C# & ASP.NET Course

For my final project, I learned how to make a web application using Entity Framework Code First. I learned how to become familiar with the different approaches to Entity Framework (like the database first approach versus code first), and how to work with databases from Visual Studio. When I started this course, I didn’t have any experience with the .NET Framework or C#. Through this course I learned how the .NET Framework actually works, as well as how to create interactive and dynamic web applications with C#, and the difference between ASP.NET and ASP.NET MVC. I enjoyed the tutorials with Bob Tabor because I got to practice all of the concepts I learned, whether it was working with strings, creating methods, or writing conditional statements, through small challenges. This course was helpful for me because I got to work with both the front end side of web apps as well as the database side, and I think ASP.NET will be useful for me as a developer, because I can create dynamic web forms and apps, that also allow me to work with databases.

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1 MAR
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Version Control with Instructor Jordan V.

At The Tech Academy, one of the courses students take is Version Control. Version control is "the management of changes to documents, computer programs, large websites, and other collections of information." This course covers Version Control Systems (VCS) such as Git that tracks versions of source code as well as GitHub, a repository that allows you to check in and out of versions of files or folders. In the course one of the questions we ask is: "How can you use these tools as a software developer?" To put it simply, our student John V. told us, you can use Git and GitHub "to work on versions of files, check in/out, branch, and merge. This way you can track your programming progress and view your works on a repository. You can stop and work on it later, resolve conflicts and back up your program. A question students often need clarification on is "What's the difference between Terminal, Console and Bash? And SSH, is it the same?" Here's how one of our awesome Instructors Jordan V. explained it: "The thing about Git is there are numerous, to say the least, ways of utilizing it, from command line tools to guis of varying usefulness. Console (unless I missed it as a primary system) is the overarching term for command line tools, and how they self reference. It is another term for the command line. I'm assuming you mean Terminal in relation to Git and Macs. Which is the iOS way of manipulating Git through purely text based commands. As far as Bash and Shell (unmentioned), Bash is the Linux-based command line (usable in windows) and Shell is native to windows. SSH is a secure network protocol, (something that facilitates multiple computers to connect) it differs from the others in that it isn't so much of a VCS as a way to access a machine remotely. I've seen it used most frequently in cloud computing and people accessing their home computers from abroad. Frequently the use of whichever type is due to computer type and personal preference of the programmer. The syntax of them is usually quite similar, so it shouldn't matter too much which you use."

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